‘WeRTexas’ campaign highlights need for building materials

By |  April 22, 2019
Photo: Cemex Balcones

Cemex’s Balcones Quarry in New Braunfels, Texas, as well as other materials producers, will be depended upon to keep up with Texas’ surging population. Photo by Zach Mentz

The Texas Aggregates & Concrete Association (TACA) launched its WeRTexas campaign to build awareness of the aggregate, concrete, cement and other associated industries.

According to TACA, about 1,400 people move to Texas every day. To keep up with the state’s population surge over the next 10 years, Texas will require 15 million to 50 million more tons of aggregate; 3 million to 10 million more yards of ready-mixed concrete; and 1 million to 3 million more tons of cement.

“Few people realize how much material is required to build the things they take for granted every day as they go about their busy lives,” says David Perkins, TACA president and CEO. “We launched the WeRTexas campaign so Texas lawmakers, residents and businesses are aware of how important these industries are to the quality of our lives, how the materials are produced and that TACA member companies are the ones who deliver these essentials to the community.”

Extrapolating into future years, by 2050 Texas will require 124 million to 179 million more tons of aggregate; 25 million to 36 million more yards of concrete; and 7.5 million to 11 million more tons of cement, according to TACA.

These materials are used to build residential homes, hospitals, schools, highways, businesses and other infrastructure-related projects. For context, a residential home requires 100 yd. of concrete; a mile of six-lane highway requires 15,000 yd.; and a hospital requires 30,000 yd., according to TACA.

Zach Mentz

About the Author:

Zach Mentz is the managing editor for both Pit & Quarry and Portable Plants magazines. Zach is a graduate of the Tim Russert Department of Communications at John Carroll University. His previous experience also includes time spent in the Cleveland Indians communications department.

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