Your behavior appears to be a little unusual. Please verify that you are not a bot.


Torque tool redesign offers functionality, usability gains

By |  October 21, 2021
Hytorc was present in the North Hall of the Las Vegas Convention during MINExpo International 2021. Photo: P&Q Staff

Hytorc was present in the North Hall of the Las Vegas Convention during MINExpo International 2021. Photo: P&Q Staff

Hytorc showcased the Lithium Series II electric torque tool at MINExpo International 2021, highlighting its enhanced functionality and easy-to-use interface.

The Lithium Series II is compatible with conventional sockets, the Hytorc washer system and the Hytorc nut, the company says. The lightweight, battery-powered tool has a capacity of up to 5,000 ft.-pounds.

Hytorc COO Jason Junkers offered a demonstration of the Lithium Series II at MINExpo, noting how users can follow the interface intuitively.

“This would basically show you the pattern to follow, and it tracks the amount of torque applied,” Junkers says.

Junkers demoed the Lithium Series II with Hytorc washers, illustrating the gains users experience with the tool.

“We’re using a special washer we developed that basically allows you to eliminate any external reaction points,” he says. “[With] standard torque wrenches, if you’re turning one nut with a socket, you need something to keep the tool from twisting in your hand. So we developed [a] washer that allows you to do it in one run without any external reaction. That makes it a lot safer.”

With no external moving parts, Junkers says only the socket on the inside of the Lithium Series II moves. The tool communicates to users how many foot-pounds were applied, allowing for more repeatable torque.

“There are nuts and bolts all over equipment at this show,” Junkers says. “A lot of times it’s not the priority of the people designing [equipment] with how it gets assembled. They’re focused on the functions that the equipment is primarily doing.

“We get called in when they have these nuts and bolts in tight places that they can’t reach [and] can’t get the torque on properly. Our specialty is developing the fixtures and solutions that will allow them to get an accurate torque on there.”

Kevin Yanik

About the Author:

Kevin Yanik is the editor-in-chief of Pit & Quarry magazine. Yanik can be reached at 216-706-3724 or kyanik@northcoastmedia.net.

Comments are closed