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New belt cleaner design reduces inventory

By |  December 19, 2019
The mainframes on the QC1+ are three-piece assemblies, with a square center section and a torque tube sliding into each end. Photo courtesy of Martin Engineering

The mainframes on the QC1+ are three-piece assemblies, with a square center section and a torque tube sliding into each end. Photo courtesy of Martin Engineering

A new conveyor belt cleaner is designed with a method of holding the urethane blade in place without the need to mill any slots for holding pins.

Combining the benefits of previous designs into one product, the QC1+ belt cleaner from Martin Engineering can be cut to length to fit virtually any application, reducing the need for customers to stock multiple blade sizes to accommodate different belt widths.

Operators simply trim the blade to the desired size from the stock 9-ft. length to match the material path, slide in the blade holders and lock them in position.

The new blade can be retrofitted to virtually any Martin mainframe and most competing designs.

“In most belt cleaner designs, the blade is pinned in place, but this new approach uses a hole right in the aluminum extrusion to keep the blade firmly in position,” says Dave Mueller, conveyor products manager. “The biggest benefit to customers is the ability to buy long-length blades and cut them to size without doing any machining. Most customers have a number of different belt widths, so in the past they’ve had to stock different blade sizes. But this design can accommodate a wide range of belts with a single product.”

Five different urethane formulations are currently available for the QC1+, including standard orange for most applications, which are approved by the Mine Safety & Health Administration for mining applications.

The product is initially being launched in the United States, followed by other regions in 2020.

Kevin Yanik

About the Author:

Kevin Yanik is the editor-in-chief of Pit & Quarry magazine. Yanik can be reached at 216-706-3724 or kyanik@northcoastmedia.net.

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