‘Facescape’ spotlights importance of aggregates

By |  October 6, 2014
Cuban-American artist Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada’s “Facescape” is located between the WWII and Lincoln Memorials in Washington, D.C. Photo: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

Cuban-American artist Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada’s “Facescape” is located between the WWII and Lincoln Memorials in Washington, D.C.
Photo: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

Cuban-American artist Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada’s “Facescape,” located between the WWII and Lincoln Memorials in Washington, D.C., is the largest gravel, sand and soil portrait ever commissioned by the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery.

Created on a 6-acre stretch of land, the portrait, called “Out of Many, One,” is a composite of more than one hundred people photographed in D.C.

“’Out of Many, One’ highlights the important role that stone, sand and gravel has in our country, says Mike Johnson, president and CEO of NSSGA. “Just as sand and gravel are essential to this portrait, aggregates are literally the foundation of our economy and society.”

NSSGA member Chaney Enterprises supplied the 2,000 tons of sand needed to complete the image. The portrait will be on view during October, and then will be tilled back into the ground when the viewing period ends.

Allison Barwacz

About the Author:

Allison Barwacz is the digital media manager for North Coast Media (NCM). She completed her undergraduate degree at Ohio University where she received a Bachelor of Science in magazine journalism from the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism. She works across a number of digital platforms, which include creating e-newsletters, writing articles and posting across social media sites. She also creates content for NCM's Portable Plants magazine, GPS World magazine and Geospatial Solutions. Her understanding of the ever-changing digital media world allows her to quickly grasp what a target audience desires and create content that is appealing and relevant for any client across any platform.

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