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Austin Powder launches RFID for electronic detonators

By |  February 23, 2022
Austin Powder's RFID technology for its EStar electronic initiation system allows for flexibility and time savings for the user. Photo: Austin Powder

Austin Powder’s RFID technology for its EStar electronic initiation system allows for flexibility and time savings for the user. Photo: Austin Powder

Austin Powder introduced its new EStar RFID technology.

RFID technology makes it possible to identify the detonator without physical contact between the logger and the detonator, Austin Powder says.

Benefits of RFID detonator tagging include flexibility and time savings. In one operation, the use of RFID resulted in a 50 percent time savings over traditional direct-connect programming, according to Austin Powder.

The RFID technology on EStar, Austin Powder’s electronic initiation system, affords blasters greater flexibility on when to log holes, assign detonator timing and test detonators or branch circuit verification. Blasters can choose to assign timing to the detonators after holes are loaded and tested for continuity.

The company says its RFID feature is quicker than direct contact logging or other detonator programming methods. With RFID tagging, all required detonator information is still right where it is needed, and the logger display will still show all the necessary details about the detonator. One logger can tag up to 1,600 detonators.

Unlike standard barcode labels, Austin Powder says harsh field conditions do not impact the effectiveness of the RFID labels. Cold temperatures, snow, heavy rain and muddy or emulsion-covered labels will not compromise the data embedded in the RFID label.

“Our latest addition of RFID as a logging option offers select customers the ability to rapidly extract our EStar electronic detonator’s critical information used to assign a delay, right from the RFID tag,” says Campbell Robertson, global manager of electronic initiation. “The RFID tag works in any conditions, whether in direct sunlight or the low light underground, wet, muddy [or] even emulsion covered conditions. What’s more, the RFID tag and the data stored within it cannot be degraded by solvents.”

Jack Kopanski

About the Author:

Jack Kopanski is the Managing Editor of Pit & Quarry and Editor-in-Chief of Portable Plants. Kopanski can be reached at 216-706-3756 or jkopanski@northcoastmedia.net.

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