AEM, Northwestern reveal findings from infrastructure study

By |  May 26, 2016

Screen Shot 2016-05-26 at 3.01.15 PMThe Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) launched a study on the future trends of U.S. transportation infrastructure.

The study covers factors that will influence how transportation infrastructure will move people and goods in the year 2050. It was unveiled during a symposium hosted by AEM and Northwestern University.

According to AEM, the study was produced by a multi-disciplinary team at Northwestern, which reviewed the study’s findings and discussed how to leverage future opportunities, technologies and trends in pursuit of a national and comprehensive plan for U.S. infrastructure.

“The objective of the study is not to predict the future but to frame scenarios and trends that will inform the public and policymakers about what is possible,” says Ron De Feo, Kennametal CEO who serves as chairman of AEM’s Infrastructure Vision 2050 Task Force. “AEM and its members will use this study to articulate the factors and trends that will shape a national, long-term vision for U.S. infrastructure. There is much to discuss, debate and, most importantly, decide.”

U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Deputy Secretary Victor Mendez presented the keynote address at the symposium. Mendez noted a similar report, “Beyond Traffic,” conducted by DOT last year.

“Last year, the department released ‘Beyond Traffic,’ a report outlining the biggest challenges facing America’s infrastructure over the next three decades, including a population that will grow by 70 million more people,” Mendez says. “Close collaboration between the public and private sectors, like the partnership with AEM and Northwestern University will play an important role in determining how we move people and freight better in the future, and support the American economy.”

The symposium served as a part of AEM’s Infrastructure Vision 2050 initiative, which seeks to increase national discussion about the future of infrastructure.

Download the full study here.

Comments are closed